Thursday, 29 September 2016

Mix It Up a Notch: Midi Pleated Tartan

 I'm not sure, but I think I must've talked about this skirt in more than one occasion. This classic number was acquired in a flea market in Kassel around 3  years ago. Galuh, who accompanied me at the time, told me that the sellers were speaking Korean, but as I read the tag later on, there were Japanese and Chinese writings—and it turns out to be a Chinese brand! East Asian potluck, anyone? Such a classic piece, this skirt is best suited for autumn, I feel. It has the thick material of wool, with an underskirt made of—what feels like—satin. The pattern and length reminds me of '60s scholars. Although it has no stretch whatsoever and barely fits me around the waist, this has become one of the staple item in my wardrobe.


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Tuesday, 27 September 2016

Home Tourist

Currently reading: A Nation in Waiting by Adam Schwarz

Lately, I've been in the mood to explore my hometown. As much as I hate the traffic, how the people can be real jerks sometimes and how shitty the public transport is, I must admit that Jakarta has so much to offer in terms of history and architectural view. I've always envied bloggers like Tieka, who seems to always know where the local historical sites are—and what a view they normally are—when I realise that I've been living in the hotspot of history in Indonesia practically my whole life. I can't believe that I've been going to Surabaya to indulge myself in a little history and cultural adventure, when I've been born and raised in the biggest historical place in the country. This place is so big, that there are more museums, galleries and historical landmarks than I care to know. So I'm determined to visit more of these places. Plus, they make for lovely backdrops for my outfit posts, don't you think?

ASK by Asky dress // hand-me-down shirt + purse // thrifted loafers // ribbon as headband // photos by Akita

Around 3 weeks ago, my sister and I visited Tugu Proklamasi, which is where Indonesia's proclamation of Independence was read for the first time in 1945. It used to be President Soekarno's home lawn, which was turned into a monument site in 1961—which is the white pillar behind me there with a lightning bolt on top. It marks the spot where the proclamation manuscript was read by the President to mark our independence from any invaders. In 1980, another monument was added in the picture, with President Soekarno and Vice President Mohammad Hatta reading the manuscript. It looks much more majestic up close, but I can't believe how small it looks in photos. It just so happens that I'm reading the perfect book for the occasion as well—which I've hopefully finished already by now. If you're ever in Jakarta, do come and check it out!



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